Professional bloggers – a new way to earn a passive income


Mm, here’s interesting for you. Do you blog?

The reason I ask is because I stumbled across a very poorly written article (what a shock) when I was executing an off-topic search.  Despite its grammatical errors and misunderstanding of ‘native English’ post-article spinning, it did take me to blogging platform that may be of interest to you.

No, I’m not going to get into the ‘Google’s new algorithm is not working argument’ here.  The filters it’s applying are taking out a few of the good guys to get to the spammers, true.  But when you think of how many articles are submitted daily, to just pick out the bad ones is no mean feat.

Although, I will just say for those of you not averse to anti-Google rant, the correlation Matt Cutts and his team are finding between quality content and high page rank would see the referring site in this instance as an exception to its (yet-to-be-made) rule.

In fact, the new medium I mentioned in yesterday’s article that I’m using as an outlet for my pro-blogging, Triond, has its fair share of dross getting through the filters to publication, adding to Google’s quandary.

See – now look what you’ve done – led me all off-topic, again.

Whilst you may not like the idea of submitting your articles without a direct payment, there are four very good reasons why you should consider Triond.

Firstly, if you’re new to blogging and are thinking of touting your trade on the global freelance sites, you’re going to need a portfolio of published work. Triond gives you this opportunity without you having to run and maintain your own blog.

With the constant updates from Google, this is an aspect of blogging that can be a chore in itself if you’re holding down a full-time job, too. Use your profile page to highlight your work, where it’s been published and use any of the drag-and-drop features that could provide prospective employers an at-a-glance overview of your blogging prowess.

Secondly, no-cost start-up. The sites that Triond will publish your work on are established, have plenty of fresh content every day and they deal with all of the off-site SEO.  Therefore, you haven’t got the headache of driving traffic to your articles.  You can get on with what you do best: blogging news, informative or how-to articles.

Thirdly, passive income. When you’re a newbie blogger, unless you pitch your rate extremely low, you’ll be lucky to find clients willing to give you a chance. Talking prices on oDesk, I’m thinking typically $1-$2/500 words, max.

Wouldn’t you rather tell that client to stuff his dollar or two and publish your work for free yourself instead with the possibility of earning from that article for a lifetime?

Fourth and finally, writers network. There is a community on Triond, very much like its own little social network for writers.

I’m yet to befriend anyone and, once this week’s out the way, I’m off to ‘add friends’ and get their insights into what works best, which niches generate the most views>>traffic>>ad revenue>>income and what there experiences are of the Triond platform.

Talking of social networks, within your profile you have the ability to link to your existing online presence.  That means you can also share your published articles with a ready-made audience, your friends and followers. Running Adsense means you don’t have to know their wish-list, the cookies do it for you.

That means that the articles you write may not be to your complete list of followers’ tastes, but your revenue comes from on-site ads. Just because your friend’s not into the new Nexus 4, say, doesn’t mean that the intuitive ads won’t display a relevant topic for your friend based on what the ad-bots unearth on their hard drive.

I’ll leave you with that food for thought for today. These Triond articles will be published in a new Scoop.It topic, Pro-blogging, rather than on here, being wary of duplicate content, ‘n’ all.

As far as I know, curated content does not get indexed in the same way that blogged content does.  Therefore there’s no need to fear plagiarism – or use my Copyscape credit – for my own content!?

What I do intend to do moving forward is, at the end of each week, embed the articles from where I’ve pinned them on Pinterest.  This will hopefully provide an ongoing insight into the niches targeted via Triond and/or what’s trending.

Whenever possible, I’ll also try to display the stats to give you some idea of the traffic you can expect.  They’re a little irrelevant, so early in the game, but they should build up over time.

To date, here’s day one-thru-four and, assuming I’m published on Friday too, I’ll embed the last article from Pinterest just above the footer.  Enjoy the content and I hope to see you on Triond.

Day One, Triond – article declined, but that was purely down to the gateway not being opened. I had, however, published the article on darrelldoo4absolution by the time Nathan, one of the reps, got back to me and told me that the gateway was now opened after I’d submitted a complaint.
Day Two, Triond

Source: socyberty.com via Jerald on Pinterest

Day Three, Triond

Source: bizcovering.com via Jerald on Pinterest

Day Four, Triond

Source: computersight.com via Jerald on Pinterest

Day Five, Triond

Source: sportales.com via Jerald on Pinterest

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2 thoughts on “Professional bloggers – a new way to earn a passive income

  1. You’re so right about all the benefits, especially when it comes to novice bloggers just getting into the ‘game!’ I would add that Triond, although writers aren’t supposed to be able to specifically promote a product, site, or service, is a place that you can use your other online writing portals – blogs, business websites, personal websites, etc.. – as a source, reference point, or example. In other words…. someone has a self-run foodie blog. This person can submit recipes, how to articles, nutrition articles, etc.. to Triond as they ‘re simultaneously building quality content on their own blog. Find inlets on the Triond content to stick in an appropriate link back to the foodie blog. To further build links, you can respond to comments by referring them (via link) to your foodie blog for more detailed info about a particular subject. It’s work, of course. However, I don’t know of a blog out there that was just created, left alone, and actually thrived!

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    1. Fantastic information from Jo – from link-building strategies tom personal exposure on two counts, Triond has the potential to be a fantastic blogger’s facility – if only they’d cut the ‘crappola’, we’d be winning hands down.
      Thanks again, Jo, for your wonderful insight and advice to potential newbie bloggers. See you on Triond.
      Zeb. x

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